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Have Proper Iodine Intake For Thyroid

Friday - November 10, 2017 10:20 pm , Category : WTN SPECIAL

Iodine deficiency is the single biggest reason for thyroid disorders across the world. A low iodine diet can cause hypothyroidism, an enlarged thyroid gland (goitre) and can affect fertility, pregnancy and neuro-developmental disorders in newborns.


Low birth weights may also result from iodine deficiency. Iodine deficiency is a major cause of lowered IQ in children, according to leading international health authorities, including the World Health Organisation (WHO), UNICEF and the International Council for the Control of Iodine Deficiency Disorders (ICCIDD). Iodine is a naturally found chemical element found abundantly in sea water though its distribution over land and freshwater bodies is uneven. 

In countries such as Australia and New Zealand, natural iodine levels are very low in the soils where vegetables and grains are grown, and cattle grazed. This lack is causing thyroid problems and other IDDs (Iodine deficiency disorders) in the people of these countries. Iodine supplementation is recommended for every woman contemplating pregnancy, is pregnant or lactating. 

The thyroid gland is a critical part of the endocrine system of an individual. It regulates heart rate and blood flow to organs, promotes linear growth and brain development in children, controls the metabolism of fat and carbohydrates and boosts protein synthesis apart from improving reproductive health. A person may have low iodine levels without showing symptoms. 

The most reliable way to check your iodine intake is to ask your doctor to order a urine test. Your doctor may also use a blood test to ensure that your thyroid hormone levels are normal. Symptoms of hypothyroidism – which can be related to low iodine levels or other forms of ‘underactive’ thyroid disease include lethargy and tiredness, poor memory, hair loss, dry skin, depression, constipation and sudden weight gain.

The main sources of iodine are seafood, dairy milk or dairy products, commercial bread, eggs and foods containing iodized salt. According to WHO recommendation, 90 ug (micrograms or millionths of a gram) is suitable for children up to seven years of age. Those between 7 to 12 years of age need 120ug, while adults above 12 can have up to 150 ugs of iodine. Lactating/pregnant women should have about 200-240 ug of intake during the period.-
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