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Aftaba became popular amongst visitors

Sunday - December 31, 2017 8:43 pm , Category : BHOPAL

Bhopal: Under the popular museum series 'Exhibit of the Month' of Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya, a traditional object is displayed in the appearance for a whole month. The exhibit for the month of December, 2017 is "Aftaba".  The Aftaba is one of the object that is most characteristic of everyday life in Islamic World. The ewer stands on a circular foot. The roundness of the Indian ewers infact reveal the influence of the mellonate shape of the Indian pot.  

Both in India, and in the Islamic lands of the Middle East, the hot and harsh climate make a water bearing vessel very important. It was used for ritually cleansing one's had before prayer and for washing hands before and after meal. The ewer thus was an important part of every aristocratic as well as middle class house hold. It would have originally been part of a set and would have had a matching sailabchi (basin). In Islamic thought and in poetry, particularly in Persia, water has always had a great significance. Paradise or Jannat in Quaran is described as a garden and gardens depend on water. Aftaba held a cultural significance as well, Ewers and other water container were very popular motifs in art and architecture. From the earliest period, right until the nineteenth century they also formed the subject of many Iranian ceramics. Ewers are commonly seen in Persian and Mughal paintings amongst the utensils and items depicted in royal court scenes as well as in the niches of palaces as items of decoration.

Making: for the making of A Aftaba, An artist or mould-maker creates an original model from wax, clay, or another material. Wax and oil-based clay are often preferred because these materials retain their softness. A mould is made of the original model or sculpture. The rigid outer moulds contain the softer inner mould, which is the exact negative of the original model. In Indian rural contex inner moulds are usually made of a mixture of rice husk, clay, fine send and cow dung which is covered by the outer mould. Most moulds are made of at least two pieces, and a shim with keys is placed between the parts during construction so that the mould can be put back together accurately.

     Once the mould is finished, it is dried in sun and minor cracks are also filled carefully. Finally a funnels shaped hollow tube is made at the end and at various points of desired model from which wax can reach to the mould. Thus ready mould is put in to the hearth and heated on equal temperature as on which the brass in a separate furnace is melten. Versitile artisan judge the temperature of hearth suitable for melting of brass with their experience. In this process the wax is burnt out living impression on clay. Melted brass is poured into the mould which fills the space created due to burning of wax. The process is done carefully and sculptor and the assistant need to be ready to fill up the cracks if any while pouring the metal. Thus casted moulds are kept for cooling for 3-4 hours, after which original sculpture is obtained by destroying outer mould.-Window To News
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