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Urinary, respiratory tract infections may double stroke risk: Study

Wednesday - March 14, 2018 5:20 pm , Category : HEALTH

New York March 14 (IANS) Those suffering from urinary or respiratory tract infections may face nearly double the risk of heart attacks and strokes than obesity researchers have warned.



The study -- led by a researcher of Indian origin -- found that if the frequency of these common infections causing hospitalisation continues for a longer period it may even lead to death.

Patients diagnosed with any one of these common infections were three times more likely to die than those without prior infection after developing heart disease and almost twice as likely to die if they had a stroke.

"Our figures suggest that those who are admitted to hospital with a respiratory or urinary tract infection are 40 per cent more likely to suffer a subsequent heart attack and 2.5 times more likely to have a stroke than patients who have had no such infection - and are considerably less likely to survive from these conditions " Rahul Potluri researcher at Britain s Aston University said in a statement.

The effects of the common infections were of similar magnitude among the people suffering from diabetes hypertension and cholesterol researchers said.

"It is notable that infection appears to confer as much if not more of a risk for future heart disease and stroke as very well established risk factors such as high blood pressure and diabetes " Potluri added.

Researchers conducted the study over 34 027 patients who had been admitted with a urinary or respiratory tract infection with an age and sex-matched control group without infection.

Factors such as age gender ethnicity obesity and tobacco use as well as medical conditions including excess cholesterol high blood pressure diabetes and kidney disease heart failure and atrial fibrillation were also taken into account.

--IANS
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