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Indore sweeps ‘clean’ hat-trick

Friday - March 8, 2019 10:34 am , Category : WTN SPECIAL

Indore’s claiming the hat-trick for being the cleanest city in the country is an occasion of much pride and celebration for not only Indoreans but also for the people of the state.


WTN- Third time in a row is no mean achievement in any field of life. Three consecutive hits in Bollywood makes one a superstar. Three wickets together can win a player the man-of-the-match award. Indore’s claiming the hat-trick for being the cleanest city in the country is an occasion of much pride and celebration for not only Indoreans but also for the people of the state. More so, because Indore happens to be the only city in the state to bag this coveted award beating some of the major cities of the country by huge margins.

It should be considered a serious feat because Indore is a very big city, with a population of around 2.5 millions. It is always difficult to manage a big city so meticulously that not a speck of litter is strewn anywhere. Indore has a large floating population and a large section of settlers who have migrated from small towns or villages, where traditionally they have not been following a very strict cleanliness regime.

To guide them to a different way of life and extract from them that high standard of perfection bears testimony to the sincerity, persistence and professional competence of the city’s municipal corporation and its diligent staffers who took it upon themselves to take Indore to the top.

Several rounds of inspections were held by different government panels, including surprise checks, to ascertain the veracity of the cleanliness claims and every time Indore surprised them. Four years back, the city was a litter bin, with every street corner being a virtual garbage dump. Today they have been displaced by public toilets, car parking slots or gardens.

The applause is not just for achieving the hallmark but also because of sustaining the cleanliness level for three straight years. That’s perhaps the more difficult part – a position might be reached once but to retain the position needs constant effort, which is not easy to maintain, given the large government paraphernalia and multi-level coordination involved in it. We have reason to hope that Indore will be number one next year as well, for cleanliness has become a habit with the people here. Indore is an example of how the government machinery, if used to its potential, can change a whole system and outlook and how it is only our lack of sincerity that ditches many of our possibilities.

Strict and constant monitoring, massive awareness drives on a regular basis, immediate punishment to the wrongdoers in the form of challans etc., setting up of public toilets, incentives to those promoting cleanliness, putting up garbage bins in every nook and corner of the city were some of the major steps that changed the lifestyle and approach of the people. Cleanliness became a pressing call for all and no one dared to break the rules for the implications were severe.

Now with constant practice abetted by the carrot and stick policy has made it a culture of the city and everyone now falls naturally in line, just the way Indians stop spitting when on the streets of Singapore! One more takeaway is the fact that if cleanliness can be induced this way, many other social ills can be addressed the same way. For instance the poor traffic sense of Indoreans can be improved drastically if a massive effort like the cleanliness mission is taken up.

Hopefully, someday the government will take cue from its own flagship cleanliness programme and extend the same work footprint to other fields too, to improve our overall quality of life.

-Window To News