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Is grounding Boeing 737 Max the solution?

Monday - March 18, 2019 10:04 am , Category : WTN SPECIAL

Question marks on Boeing 737 Max 8 planes after two consecutive aircraft crashes!
 
MAR 18 (WTN) – Air travelers have been hit badly this season. First it was the grounding of the Jet Airways flights that disrupted several travel plans, leading to loss of huge money. As if that was not enough, coming close on its heels was the complete grounding of the Boeing 737 Max planes following the Ethiopian Airlines recent accident that raised questions on the safety of this make of planes.
 
What tipped the scales against Boeing was that the Ethiopian plane crash was not an isolated case; a few months back a Lion Air plane of Indonesia had also suffered the same fate in the same plane model. There were reports of other close shaves too in the same 737 Max that further raised doubts about its usability. Globally there are close to 380 Max aircraft in operation, almost all of which have been grounded now, at least till May.
 
The company is trying hard to ascertain the reason/s behind the glitches that led to the accidents and unless it comes up with a solid and convincing reason and an equally effective remedy, it is not likely that the airline companies will fly it further, even if it means heavy losses to them and also inconvenience to passengers. But is grounding the solution? Is the plane so flawed that pilots cannot handle it? The case is not so. Even though the panic button has been pressed, the mechanical part is simple. The plane has a computer on board that helps the aircraft stabilize on takeoff. Or in other words, there is a system in which the computer gauges the vertical lift of the plane and drives the nose down if it sees it going too much upwards.
 
This assessment by the computer is sometimes going counter to the assessment of the pilot. So, when the pilot is trying to climb up, the computer is trying to bring it down, eventually leading to a stall. A plane cannot get stalled in air and thus it naturally falls and crashes. The catch is, a pilot can easily deactivate the computer and take manual control of the mechanicals. Why the Ethiopian Airlines pilots didn’t do so is a mystery that is still to be unraveled. Perhaps they were confused or forgot to deactivate it. Had the two cutouts of the computer been brought out, the plane could have been under the pilot’s maneuvering, which did not happen. Yes, the computer not in consonance with the pilot is a glitch for certain, because ideally the computer reading could be accurate. Having said that, it also must be reckoned that ultimately human considerations matter and pilots should use their discretions when they find the computers wrong.
 
Here comes the question of proper training to the pilots and the discipline they carry. There have been incidents of fake licenses and training certificates to undertrained pilots. In India, typically there are institutes that are neither affiliated nor well facilitated but end up giving training to pilots, who, when they fly the aircraft, are short of innovations and improvisations that are an important part of safe maneuvering. A machine is a machine and no computer can be blindly trusted without human veracity. When we look into the problems in the plane, we must also stress the standard and efficiency of the training and experience our pilots get. - Window To News