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Hyderabad centre to phase out animals as 'guinea pigs'

Thursday - April 25, 2019 6:38 pm , Category : SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY
Hyderabad, April 25 (IANS) A centre for promoting alternatives to use of animal for experiments was launched on Thursday at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) here.
The Centre for Predictive Human Model Systems was launched by Atal Incubation Centre (AIC) at the CCMB in collaboration with Humane Society International/ India (HSI/India).
The centre aims to prioritise investment in human-based, non-animal methodologies in life sciences research in India.
This will be done by establishing a multi-stakeholder think-tank that represents the growing body of expertise on new approach methodologies on a scientific and policy level, HSI/India said.
Dr Madhusudan Rao, CEO of AIC-CCMB, said predictive human biology sector is ripe for investment. He is confident that this partnership with HSI/India will kindle the much-needed investment in this field.
"With the uniqueness that the centre brings, we endeavour to plug the loopholes that the health research faces. We aim for this centre to be the pioneer in promoting advanced, accurate, reliable science which is also more ethical," said Alokparna Sengupta, Deputy Director, HSI/India.
Researchers have been critically assessing the validity and reliability of data obtained from animal experimentation to predict human outcomes and develop a better understanding of the human physiology.
New approach methodologies that do not involve the use of alive animals are demonstrating more human relevance and thus promise improved outcomes for human health protection and medical interventions, said HSI/India.

--IANS ms/nir