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Is Taj Mahal really a mausoleum?

Monday - May 13, 2019 10:42 am , Category : WTN SPECIAL


WTN- The Taj Mahal is celebrated as a mausoleum of unique structural sublimity and historical legacy. But is it really a mausoleum of Mumtaz Mahal and Shahjahan as it is believed to be or has it some other lineage, hidden behind the layers of historical manipulations? Who testifies that it was not originally a temple, before being displaced by the Mughals to establish their supremacy? Do we need to blindly believe a set of ‘liberal’ historians, all products of the same ideological school, who have for generations repeated the same history, with us meekly accepting what has been handed down to us as true? Can we so easily brush aside the facts that establish that the spot where the Taj today stands was actually a Hindu temple named Tejo Mahalay, a Shiva temple?

There are many proofs that tell us Taj was originally built in 1155 AD by Raja Paramardi Dev and a Sanskrit inscription too supports the conclusion that the Taj originated as a Siva temple. A wooden piece from the riverside doorway of the Taj subjected to the carbon 14 test by an American laboratory, has revealed the door to be 300 years older than Shahjahan, which again tells about the original genesis of the Taj, that should be around 1155 AD. The lotus architecture on top of the Taj’s dome again points towards its Hindu origins because lotus is a prominent Hindu totem of religious significance which has little to do with Muslim architecture. There are other structural indications too which refute the Taj Mahal’s claim to be an original Muslim marvel.

The pillars at the four corners for instance, are towers, but not minarets. Hindu towers always start from the floor level, but Moghul minarets rise from the shoulder of buildings. The list doesn’t end here. It is Hindu temples that are predominantly built on river banks. The Yamuna flowing by the Taj also had ghats, the way there are bathing ghats around most Hindu temples of repute even today. There is hardly any tradition of mosques or tombs built around rivers or water bodies. Then, the word ‘Mahal’ is basically a Hindu word, used for Hindu palaces from time immemorial. Nowhere in the Muslim world there is any reference of any building as Mahal. How could Shahjahan use this name out of the blue for a typically ‘Muslim’ building?

There is another clue that leads us to the Hindu antecedents of the Taj Mahal. The tradition of removing one’s shoes before climbing the marble platform originates from pre-Shahjahan times, because this is a practice traditionally reserved for entering Hindu temples. Had the Taj originated as a tomb, shoes need not have to be removed because shoes are a necessity in a cemetery. Moreover, the use of captured temples and mansions as a burial place for dead courtiers and royalty was a common practice among Muslim rulers. Tejo-Mahalay had to suffer the same fate. Many foreign visitors who came to Agra around the 1600s, have mentioned in various references the existence of a building like the Taj, which again means that it was long extant and was not being built by Shahjahan in the 1600s as is reported.

There are several sealed chambers and walls in the Taj, hidden from the public since Shahjahan’s time. Archeological studies in the 1960s reportedly found many Hindu idols and images in those chambers but they were never publically disclosed in fear of disrupting the status quo and incensing certain groups. It is time that the real origin and history of the Taj Mahal is unearthed by a new and systematic comprehensive study in an objective and transparent manner and the glory of ancient Hindu culture and religion given its rightful place. – Window To News