BrahMos WORLD INDIA MADHYA PRADESH BHOPAL SPORTS BUSINESS FUN FACTS ENTERTAINMENT LIFESTYLE TRAVEL ART & LITERATURE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY HEALTH EDUCATION DIASPORA WTN SPECIAL OPINION & INTERVIEW GOSSIP CORNER RECIPES DRINKS BIG MEMSAAB 2017 BUDGET 2017 FUNNY VIDEOS VIRAL ON WEB PICTURE STORIES Mahakal Ke Darshan
ABOUT US PRIVACY POLICY SITEMAP CONTACT US
logo
Breaking News


How privatisation can usher in quality education

Thursday - September 21, 2017 5:00 am , Category : WTN SPECIAL

By Jaya khare

Despite a plethora of private institutions in town cropping up the every other day to cater to the growing and specialised demands of today’s youth, we are still basically a government-run system. We have over 300-odd government universities in the country which serve the bulk of our students pursuing higher education. 

Also we have thousands of government schools and colleges spread across the length and breadth of the country which, again, cater to the education needs of the largest number of our students. Compared to the government setup, our private education sector is still at a nascent stage. 

Majority of people still cannot afford to put their children in posh private schools which charge Rs 1 to 5 lakh rupees per annum. Most people pay for the engineering and medical college fees through their nose. The government institutes charge less than half the money compared to private colleges teaching the same courses. 

Quality of education and exposure is certainly better in most private institutes in the school education segment. But the same cannot be said about institutes of higher education where the IITs, IIITs, IIMs, NLIUs and AIIMSs still rule the roost. Several private institutes have faltered to uphold quality education, a promise they had set out with. 

Exorbitant fees, lack of qualified faculty, lack of proper campus placements mar most private technical institutes barring a few like ISB, Hyderabad for instance or an Asian College of Journalism etc. There are two options before the government to rope in the best of the private education system. Either it can allow FDI in the government institutes so that fund scarcity doesn’t come as a roadblock at any stage and the latest scientific and technological innovations are more readily available to students and researchers, which the government cannot always afford or have access to. 

The second option is to closely monitor the quality and sustainability of indigenous private institutes and giving them licence discerningly. Today anyone with money can open an institute. Various mandated rules and regulations are flouted towards which AICTE needs to be more attentive. Strict action must be taken against defaulters to purge the system of unwanted elements. 

Also, the lacunae and problems in the system that affect the efficient functioning of private institutes must also be resolved by the government agencies to set up an atmosphere of excellence in education. The processes of approvals and sanctions need to be streamlined and red tape delays minimised. 

An atmosphere needs to be created which can attract foreign ideas and influences so that the education system in the country is not only rejuvenated from a relative rut but it also gets abreast with global advancements in respective fields leading our students to find greater affiliation with other universities with their learning more in relevance and sync with modern trends.-Window To News


www.windowtonews
 
Leave a Comment
* Name
* Email (will not be published)
*
* - Required fields