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‘This decision’ of the Modi government to stop messing with people's health

Wednesday - February 26, 2020 1:36 pm , Category : WTN SPECIAL
The complaint about adulteration and rancidity found in open sweets
The complaint about adulteration and rancidity found in open sweets

Now shopkeepers to have to provide information about the manufacturing and expiry date of open sweets

FEB 26 (WTN) - Sweets have always been an important part of the Indian food system. There is a rich Indian tradition of eating and distributing sweets at any time from festivals to happiness. Variety of sweets is found in every state of India. You will find many sweet shops in any city or town in India. But for the last few years, it has been found that in the lure of high profits, adulterated condensed milk and stale sweets are sold at the sweet shops. It is natural that eating such sweets messes with people's health. 

As you know that if there is a company made packed-sweets, the manufacturing and expiry date are clearly written in it. But customers do not know about the open sweets sold at the shops, how long it has been prepared? And what is the expiry date of the sweets? This mess has been happening with the health of customers for many years, but now strictness is going to be taken here. In fact, the Modi government is going to implement a new rule to improve the quality of food and beverages available at sweets shops. What is this new rule? Let us tell you about it in detail.

In fact, now after June 1, 2020, it will be necessary to display information such as the date of manufacturing and expiry of the open sweets kept in the sweet shops. As we told you earlier, currently, only such instructions are written on packed-sweets. But now the manufacturing and expiry date related information to be written on the trays or containers of the sweets kept on the shops. Now, shopkeepers will have to give full information about when the sweet has made, what ingredients have used to prepare it, and how long the sweet can be used.

The FSSAI (Food Safety and Standards Authority of India) has taken this big step in view of the threat to people's health. The FSSAI had received complaints that some shopkeepers also sell spoiled sweets. In such a situation, the FSSAI is trying to prevent the shopkeepers from selling stale and adulterated sweets, for which strict steps are being taken. The FSSAI clearly states that in the public interest and to ensure food safety, it has been decided that in the case of open-sale sweets, the 'date of manufacture' and 'date of expiry' to be written on the trays or containers of sweets, and it will be mandatory. The FSSAI has asked the State Food Safety Commissioners to ensure adherence to these instructions. 

This step taken by the FSSAI will enable the common people to get information about the sweets available in shops that which sweets they are buying so what are the ingredients used to make them, and when how long it can be used to eat up. Seizure of fake condensed milk and sweets made from it during Diwali and other festivals is a common practice. But now that the FSSAI has given clear instructions to the shopkeepers that they will have to inform the customers about the packed-sweets, so it is expected that the customers will get rid of adulterated and rancid sweets. 

But here, FSNM (Federation of Sweets & Namkeen Manufacturers), the country's largest organization of sweet sellers, has started demanding changes to it, calling the FSSAI order as impractical. In this regard, the FSNM says that the government neither discussed them nor took them into confidence before taking such a big decision. In fact, the sweets sellers argue that how would it be possible to write manufacturing and expiry dates on the trays of Jalebi, Imarti, and Laddu made in the morning and sold till noon or evening? FSNM argues that only three percent of sweets are packed in the country, while 97 percent of sweets are sold open. Explain that FSNM has started discussion with FSSAI. At the same time, a proposal will be submitted to the government by the FSNM in a few days that on the order of FSSAI, and the middle path should be adopted.