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Breaking News

Hollywood studios change plans due to coronavirus crisis

Saturday - February 29, 2020 1:27 pm , Category : ENTERTAINMENT
Los Angeles, Feb 29 (IANS) Hollywood's efforts to launch major movies and shows have been greatly affected by the coronavirus outbreak.
Companies are asking employees to delay work trips to countries such as China, Japan, Italy and South Korea, the regions that have been the most affected by the disease. Studios have already cancelled plans for China premieres for films such as Disney's "Mulan" and the James Bond movie "No Time to Die", reports variety.com.
Sony's "Bloodsport" was also expected to screen in China, but that release date remains uncertain.
Most of these films hadn't gotten the official approval from the Chinese authorities that they would be allowed to screen in the country, but chances are less that will come any time soon, as movie theatres in China have been shut.
There are also indications that several upcoming movies such as "Mulan", "The Grudge", and "Onward" will delay their release in Italy, where the number of cases recently jumped to 400.
So far, the disease, named COVID-19, has infected over 82,500 people and killed 2,810 across the globe.
No studios were willing to go on the record about their response to the crisis, but privately they said they were taking "a wait-and-see" approach.
Most of the major studios have started putting together advisory teams comprising members of their production, marketing, finance, and human resources staff to assess the potential impact of the disease. Part of their task is to figure out how the staff in these affected areas can remain safe.
Studio executives believe that the theatre closures in China and Italy, as well as the spread of the disease in major markets such as South Korea, could result in billions of dollars in lost ticket sales.

--IANS nn/dpb