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No salon, no helping hand -- issues that hassle people

Sunday - April 5, 2020 9:39 pm , Category : INDIA
New Delhi, April 5 (IANS) Mrs Khurana, a housewife, in Supertech Capetown of Noida, has been losing her patience as unwashed clothes are piling up due to non-availability of washermen.
Balwinder Bawa, a retired doctor, in sector 19 of Noida, needs his broken spectacle fixed.
Mrs Khurana and Dr Bawa represent the people and their daily issues, for whom milk, eggs and bread are not enough to sustain.
After the 21-day nationwide lockdown, announced by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on March 24, there have been several relaxations in the shutdown norms, like allowing repair shops on highways, but it didn't include common issues faced by the middle class families.
Subdhabrata Dasgupta, an executive, was bothered by his growing hairs. He had no choice, as salons across India are shut till April 14, than to ask his family members to trim them.
Also, as many professionals were forced to opt for the work-from-home option, they need to look presentable during the daily video conferencing with clients and colleagues.
There are various such issues, that never were issues in normal times.
"I stay alone. I am 74. Can you imagine the hardship I face everyday to clean the house, however, minimal. Also, cook food and wash utensils?", said Manju Saha from Kolkata's Lake Gardens.
While the Kolkata Police have extended a helping hand to ensure adequate supply of essential commodities and services, it doesn't take away the harsh reality for the 74-year-old staying alone.
On the other side of the lockdown coin are people like Mrs Khurana's washarman Kishen. He is facing the issue of sustenance.
For nearly half a month, he hasn't earned a penny and is itching to resume his work. While ration reached him, albeit belatedly, it has not been sufficient for a family of five.
Most salon workers are unlikely to get paid this month, if the shutdown continues.
The story is the same for Dr Bawa's optician. He/she is unlikely to be paid salary, or if he own the shop, he would have to dig into savings to pay the rent for the commercial space that's shut for business.
There are thousands like them who are staring at an uncertain future as the lockdown continues.

--IANS abn/pcj